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Point Mugu State Park Beaches

Point Mugu Beach, Thornhill Broome Beach,
Sycamore Cove Beach

Point Mugu State Park

Location

9000 W. Pacific Coast Hwy.
15 miles south of Oxnard, CA
(310) 457-8143

Admission

Day use per vehicle: $12
Gate locked: 10:00 PM - 8:00 AM

Main Attractions

  • 3.6 miles of ocean shoreline
  • Swimming, body surfing
  • Hiking, fishing
  • Camping

Facilities and Features

  • Parking, restrooms
  • Campgrounds with restrooms and showers
  • Lifeguards during summer
  • Dump station
  • Hiking trails
  • Picnic area

Accessibility

  • Campsites
  • Parking, restrooms
  • Nature trail (partially)
  • Call (805) 488-7844 to reserve beach wheelchair at Sycamore Cove.

Hazards

  • Rip currents
  • Rogue waves
  • Blowing sand

Caution: Check with rangers or lifeguards that conditions are safe for your planned activities.

Special Regulations

  • Dogs on leash allowed in campground, but be in enclosed vehicle or tent at night.
  • No dogs on trails or beach.
  • No fires on beach, only in provided fire rings.
  • Do not disturb natural features

Nearby Beaches

  • Hueneme Beach, 11 miles north
  • Robert H. Meyer Memorial State Beach (El Pescador, La Piedra, El Matador), 7 - 9 miles south
  • Zuma Beach, 11 miles south



Point Mugu State Park map, Ventura County, CA

Point Mugu
State Park

Point Mugu State Park is 15 miles south of Oxnard. The 15,000-acre park has a variety of recreation areas, including several beaches - Point Mugu Beach, Thornhill Broome Beach, and Sycamore Cove Beach. South of the park are two other popular beaches - County Line Beach (AKA Yerba Buena Beach) and Staircase Beach.

Point Mugu Beach

Point Mugu Beach, a one-third-mile long triangle of sand, is located between Point Mugu Rock and the Naval property. Parking is found along the side of the highway next to the beach. Lifeguards are on duty during the summer.

Point Mugu beach, Ventura County, CA

Point Mugu Beach

Thornhill Broome Beach

Thornhill Broome Beach, formerly known as La Jolla Beach, is one of the few places in California that allows camping right on the beach. The sandy beach makes a nice place to enjoy the sun or stroll nearly 1½ miles along the surf line. Tide pools offer fascinating views of marine life. Lifeguards are on duty during the summer, however, rip-currents are still a danger and swimmers should be wary. Restrooms are portable toilets. There are no day-use facilities.

Thornhill Broome Beach, Point Mugu State Park, Ventura County, CA

Thornhill Broome Beach

Sycamore Cove Beach

Sycamore Cove, at the mouth of Sycamore Canyon, serves as the headquarters for Mugu State Park. Facilities include campgrounds and a day use area with picnic tables, BBQs, restrooms, and showers. Lifeguards are on duty during the summer. The sandy beach is one-third of a mile long.

Sycamore Cove Beach, Point Mugu State Park, Ventura County, CA
Sycamore Cove Beach

Point Mugu Wildlife

Beach visitors who cast their eyes toward the ocean are often rewarded with the spectacle of dolphins arcing through the water, harbor seals, whales, and sea lions. Common birds along the shore are cormorants, brown pelicans, least terns, and gulls.

Inland a variety of animals live in the woods. Among them are skunks, deer, foxes, and even mountain lions. Birds around Sycamore Canyon include woodpeckers, warblers, thrashers, Peregrine falcons, and towhees.

Wildfire

The Springs Fire in May 2013 scorched about 12,000 acres in the park, severely damaging habitat. For a short time many park facilities were closed. Most re-opened by Memorial Day 2013, but park officials continue to monitor habitat recovery. Some trails may be closed to aid in the recovery.

Beach Supplies

Stock up on supplies in Oxnard or Malibu before heading to Point Mugu State Park. Both towns are about 10 miles from the park. Starbucks is found in Trancas Market Shopping Center just north of Zuma Beach in Malibu.

Ocean Safety

California State Parks and Recreation cautions that "large surf, cold water temperatures, backwash, sudden drop-offs, pounding shorebreak, and dangerous rip currents can turn what seem like safe activities such as playing near the surf line, wading, or climbing on rock outcroppings, deadly." Learn more about ocean safety at CA State Parks: Ocean Safety

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